We can have reverence for tradition and also have fun learning about ourselves with the medicine.

We can have reverence for tradition and also have fun learning about ourselves with the medicine.

When I think about my iboga journey that was guided by Sherry, I’m immediately brought to a place and consideration of her warmth and courage.

Sherry is a friend and a sister through Bwiti tradition. She fiercely maintains the values of Missoko Bwiti and is unwavering in her commitment to strengthening herself so that she can be of ultimate service within ceremony. People often view ceremony as a time that is supposed to be strictly serious and sacred in nature. Sherry has shown me that we can have reverence for tradition and also have fun learning about ourselves with the medicine. It’s not that the ceremony is recreational by any means, but it’s a time in which we can see that our life is made up of laughter, dance, celebration, and light-heartedness so that we can be receptive to the teachings of Bwiti. This tradition is about learning how to live and live well. I’ve been locked up in psychological trauma for certain portions of my life, and Sherry has taught me that forgiveness is the most powerful learning I can offer myself. We’re not meant to hold regret or judgments in our hearts, and when we can forgive ourselves and others, it opens us to really recognizing our value as sovereign beings.
Forgiveness is made tangible in ceremony. We often look at esteemed virtues and principles as abstract in nature… something barely out of reach. Sherry will show you through personal testimony and traditional storytelling that these things are within immediate reach as well as application. When you sit around the fire with her, you’re of course sitting with a teacher who is committing their life to Bwiti, but know too that you’re also communing with a friend who will encourage and guide you toward activating and thriving in all the unique ways that you yourself know deep down is completely possible.  

~ BK